brand clarity exercise

Design principle: KISS

Let me tell you something, throughout my career in graphic design, I’ve heard so many design principles and rules you should stick to, I can’t even count them anymore. Some are just ridiculous and should be ignored, others are good to know and a few are really principles that become mantras in your life. The KISS principle (or Keep it simple, stupid) is one of the latter. So let me show you why and how to use it and improve your images | thatistheday.com

Let me tell you something, throughout my career in graphic design, I’ve heard so many design principles and rules you should stick to, I can’t even count them anymore. Some are just ridiculous and should be ignored, others are good to know and a few are really principles that become mantras in your life. The KISS principle (or Keep it simple, stupid) is one of the latter. So let me show you why and how to use it and improve your images | thatistheday.com
Let me tell you something, throughout my career in graphic design, I’ve heard so many design principles and rules you should stick to, I can’t even count them anymore. Some are just ridiculous and should be ignored, others are good to know and a few are really principles that become mantras in your life. The KISS principle (or Keep it simple, stupid) is one of the latter. So let me show you why and how to use it and improve your images | thatistheday.com

 

Let me tell you something, throughout my career as a graphic designer, I’ve heard so many design principles and rules you should stick to, I can’t even count them anymore. Some are just ridiculous and should be ignored, others are good to know and a few are really principles that become mantras in your life. The KISS principle (or Keep it simple, stupid) is one of the latter. So let me show you why and how to use it in design.

 

 

What is KISS (Keep it simple, stupid)?

 

This phrase was coined by Kelly Johnson, lead engineer at the Lockheed Skunk Works, in 1960. Although he wasn’t actually talking about graphic design back then, KISS has become a well-known principle, graphic designers apply to their layouts ever since.

 

The principle’s meaning isn’t difficult to understand and very similar to “Less is more”. It stresses the importance of simplicity and urges you not overcomplicate your design.

 

Why is the KISS principle important in design?

 

Clean and simple design is focused on the audience. Of course, you want to always create with your audience in mind, but the KISS principle takes this one step further.

 

 

Simple to access

 

Even just talking functionality, a simple design is easier to produce and to access. (fast loading digital graphics, less cost for printing, easy to share)

 

Simple to understand

 

Most important information is easy to find and to grasp. With short attention spans and immense overflow of information, it’s necessary to be absolutely clear in your message. You do this by breaking a long text into paragraphs, using headlines to skim content quickly or making important information stand out e.g. in size.

 

Simple to take action

 

If it’s simple to understand, it’s easier for your audience to get the information they need and to take the action you want them to take e. g. buy your newest product or mark a date in their calendar.

 

How to create something based on the KISS principle?

 

You might think a simple design is boring and unattractive but that doesn’t have to be the case. You just need to learn how to make the best out of the most basic things you have. The result will be appealing to your audience and, even more important, it will be effective.

 

Start with a plan

 

So how do you KISS-proof your design? Before you start, you need to define the purpose of your design. You have to think about two things. Why are you creating this design and who is your audience. If you have a plan it’s easier to stick to the important stuff. Plus, the end result will be actionable because your audience will instantly figure out what they are supposed to do.

 

 

Simplify

 

Reduce everything that might be distracting. This means to stick with a limited amount of colors, fonts and style elements in your design. With every element you add, ask yourself “Does this add value?”. If it doesn’t, then there’s no reason for it to be there. It’s as simple as that. There are other rules you can apply to your design. Find out more: The basics of good design

 

Related post: The basics of good design

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